Twilight…Um, Okay.

I tried to jump on the Twilight bandwagon. (Yes, the vampire ones)

I was desperate. Don’t judge.

With a 5 hour drive alone ahead through the deserts of Arizona, I could only find two audiobooks available to stream–Harry Potter or Twilight. Harry Potter is for sure not really my genre when I choose to read, so I went with Twilight. I mean, millions of people were Team Edward or Team Jacob-ing forever, so they had to be onto something, right?

So, I listened to 13 chapters.

It’s okay, I didn’t *get* 50 Shades of Gray either.

(The current fun reads I am IN LOVE with is the Divergent series by Veronica Roth. Book 3 comes out in two weeks!!!!!)

Why is she holding an apple? Didn’t get far enough into the book. I guess I’ll never know.

5 thoughts on “Twilight…Um, Okay.

  1. Huh, I read all the books (DON’T JUDGE) and I can’t for the life of me think of why she’s holding an apple. A ham-fisted forbidden fruit allegory is my best guess.

  2. The first 120 or so pages of Twilight sucks. Then you can’t put it down.

    I refuse to waste any more of my life on 50 shades, though. One stupid book with no plotline or purpose was enough. I like Divergent!!

  3. Taken from Stephanie Meyers website:
    What’s with the apple?

    “The apple on the cover of Twilight represents “forbidden fruit.” I used the scripture from Genesis (located just after the table of contents) because I loved the phrase “the fruit of the knowledge of good and evil.” Isn’t this exactly what Bella ends up with? A working knowledge of what good is, and what evil is. The nice thing about the apple is it has so many symbolic roots. You’ve got the apple in Snow White, one bite and you’re frozen forever in a state of not-quite-death… Then you have Paris and the golden apple in Greek mythology—look how much trouble that started. Apples are quite the versatile fruit. In the end, I love the beautiful simplicity of the picture. To me it says: choice.”

    I read all of them and watched the movies. I agree that they don’t have a lot of depth but they certainly get addictive. The final book gets pretty Scifi though.

  4. Now you know!

    From http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080106114414AAlOhSX

    “The apple means “forbidden fruit”, and Edward and Bella, due to species differences, cannot be together, so Edward is Bella’s forbidden fruit and Bella is Edward’s forbidden fruit.

    Here are Stephenie Meyer’s comments:

    What’s with the apple?

    The apple on the cover of Twilight represents “forbidden fruit.” I used the scripture from Genesis (located just after the table of contents) because I loved the phrase “the fruit of the knowledge of good and evil.” Isn’t this exactly what Bella ends up with? A working knowledge of what good is, and what evil is. The nice thing about the apple is it has so many symbolic roots. You’ve got the apple in Snow White, one bite and you’re frozen forever in a state of not-quite-death… Then you have Paris and the golden apple in Greek mythology—look how much trouble that started. Apples are quite the versatile fruit. In the end, I love the beautiful simplicity of the picture. To me it says: choice”

  5. Harry Potter is a pretty worthwhile time investment. I know, I know. I sound ridiculous, but I am also a 36 year old soon-to-be single mom, so you know I’m not just a preteen macking on Ronald Weasley or anything. Both the government and overall social structure are interesting, not to mention the adult storylines in the books. Romance! Action! Adventure! Of course, I relate to them! They are all my age! And why can’t I have magic in my otherwise practical life?

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